Cessna 182 JT-A: The Diesel Version of an Old Classic

It is interesting to me how various aspects of the aviation industry evolve in unexpected ways.  Such is the development of the Cessna 182 JT-A, a diesel version of the traditional 182.

According to Robert Goyer at Flying Magazine diesel versions of general aviation aircraft are going to become more important as 100LL starts to become less available, and possibly even gets eliminated by the EPA.  Obviously, there is no way to know when that will happen or how much time will be given to transition, but the one thing we know for sure is the farther along we are in the process the better off general aviation will be.

The way that Robert describes flying this new 182 it makes me want to get my hands on one right now.  Having experienced piston driven aircraft as well as turbine driven varieties, there is really no comparison with the feel of s jet engine responding to your throttle inputs.  I realize this new version is not a turbine engine, but it sure sounds close.

Combine the need to replace 100LL and the improved performance of this new model, and they should be literally flying out of the factory.

Citation M2 Makes Its Maiden Voyage: How Many Aircraft Does Cessna Need?

The Cessna Citation M2 made its first test flight on Friday and was met with all of the typical quotes from the people involved.  They talked about how it performed just as expected and how it will be such a blessing to their customers.

That’s great that everything went so well, but I for one have to wonder if Cessna really needs another aircraft.  According to the press release from Cessna, the M2 “fills the gap between the Citation Mustang and the Citation CJ family”.  Exactly how big of a gap do they think exists there.  If you look at the Mustang, various CJ aircraft, and the new M2, most people would be hard pressed to tell you the difference.

I understand that the avionics is an upgrade over previous aircraft, but do you really need an entirely new aircraft to roll out some new avionics?  How about upgrading one of your existing aircraft instead of coming out with a new aircraft every other year?

Cessna is THE American aircraft company in my eyes.  They cover pretty much the entire general aviation market with the exception of the airline size aircraft.  They make great aircraft that are a testament to the quality of American manufacturing, but this constant roll out of new aircraft almost makes them look desperate.

Maybe I am forgetting someone, but I can’t think of a single aircraft manufacturer that offers half as many business jets as Cessna.  I would start listing them all, but just the thought of it makes my head hurt.  Most companies offer 5-10 aircraft at the very most, but without even trying I can think of at least 20 jet aircraft that Cessna offers.

You have to wonder if spreading out so much is hurting their business.  Instead of just focusing on a smaller number of aircraft and making them awesome, I get the feeling that they are trying to be a jack of all trades, but master of none.

It also seems to me that people almost start ignoring new aircraft from Cessna because there are so many of them.

I really hope that this does help their business as Cessna is a very important company in this country, I just can’t help but wonder what they are trying to accomplish with releasing new aircraft all the time.

Cessna Foresees Demand Gathering Pace in Asia-Pacific Region

SINGAPORE, February 14, 2012 — Cessna Aircraft Company, a Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT) company, said today at the Singapore Airshow the company anticipates accelerating demand for light and mid-size business jets across the Asia-Pacific region in the next decade.

Speaking at the show, Trevor Esling, vice president, Sales for EMAA (Europe, Middle East, Africa & Asia), said: “The Asia-Pacific region already accounts for 10% of Cessna’s business jet sales and we anticipate demand increasing further in the medium to long term. The region’s economic resilience during the global financial crisis, rising national prosperity and Chinese airspace liberalization make it likely that the business aviation market will mature at quite a rapid pace. Cessna therefore expects demand for light and mid-size aircraft to rise accordingly.”

In the past 12 months Cessna has undertaken various measures to strengthen its presence in the region. In China, Cessna’s dedicated Citation sales team has increased to nine members, reflecting the company’s increased focus on the commercial market and determination to build on success already achieved in the governmental sector. Cessna has also based a dedicated field service manager and is expected to complete a joint service facility, with sister-company Bell Helicopter, in the second quarter of this year in Singapore.

Esling continued: “All indications are that the Chinese economy will grow by more than 8% this year alone, while forecasts for the economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam are similarly positive. These forecasts are extremely encouraging for aviation in general, with China expected to become one of the top 10 countries for business jet ownership by 2025.”

Cessna Citation Mustang Reaches 400 Aircraft

The Mustang’s most common use is corporate business or personal travel. Its second most common use is air taxi service. In growing popularity, the Mustang is also being used for special missions as medical air transport and as an airline flight training tool.

“Having the Mustang in our fleet is a great way to get pilots into a jet for the first time — when they get behind the controls, the excitement is written all over their face,” said Rohloff. “Then, when they are ready to move up, the rest of our Citation fleet is right there waiting.”

WICHITA, Kan., Jan. 27, 2012 — Cessna Aircraft Company, a Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT) company, rolled its 400th Citation Mustang off the assembly line at its Independence, Kan., facility. This milestone was accomplished in a little more than five years since the Mustang’s first delivery in November 2006.

“What an achievement for Cessna and for the employees in Wichita and Independence who engineer, design, support and manufacture this great airplane,” said Brian Rohloff, Cessna’s Citation Mustang and M2 business leader. “Mustang sales remain strong, pilots like its ease of operation and low operating costs — it’s a compelling airplane, designed and built with Cessna ingenuity and pride.”

The Mustang’s most common use is corporate business or personal travel. Its second most common use is air taxi service. In growing popularity, the Mustang is also being used for special missions as medical air transport and as an airline flight training tool.

“Having the Mustang in our fleet is a great way to get pilots into a jet for the first time — when they get behind the controls, the excitement is written all over their face,” said Rohloff. “Then, when they are ready to move up, the rest of our Citation fleet is right there waiting.”

The worldwide fleet of Mustangs is averaging 480 hours, with 45 Mustangs having accumulated more than 1,000 hours each. High time Mustangs are 1,600 hours (typical operation) and 2,200 hours (fleet operation).

The Citation Mustang is the world’s first fully certified entry-level business jet. The program was announced at the 2002 National Business Aviation Association convention and the aircraft made its first flight in April 2005, received FAA type certificate in September 2006 and celebrated its first delivery in November 2006. Coming in at just over $3 million (2012 delivery), the Mustang features Garmin avionics, Pratt & Whitney Canada engines and boasts a maximum 1,100-nautical mile range.

More information on the Mustang can be found on the Citation Mustang page on Cessna’s website. Also, visit our gallery of Mustang images.

Citation Ten Prototype Makes First Successful Test Flight

While I worked at an FBO in Austin, TX I was fortunate enough to see aircraft of all shapes and sizes.  From big airliners to little tiny(and I mean real tiny) experimentals.  With all of the different aircraft that I saw, I don’t think there was one that I loved more than the Citation X.  For lack of a better word, it was just downright sexy.

Now Cessna has taken it one step farther with the new Citation Ten.  At first look it appears to be the exact same as the Citation X, but there are a few differences.

The Ten is a little bit longer(15 inches) providing more leg room for the passengers.  It is also is able to get to altitude more quickly and is more fuel-efficient giving it a longer range(3242 nautical miles).

It also boasts the Garmin G5000 avionics suite which utilizes high-resolution multi-function displays to give the pilots all the information they could ever want.  Garmin’s synthetic vision technology also provides a virtual view of runways, terrain, traffic and obstacles.

Obviously there is not much real footage out there, but there is a cool little promo video on YouTube, as well as some very cool images on Cessna’s website.

I don’t know that I am ready to give my heart to another plane yet, but Cessna has certainly raised their game to the next level.